Sir Craig Reedie honored with GBE award for his outstanding services

Delta Optimist

Nirupama Image Courtesy: Delta Optimist 16 Jun, 2018

The prestigious award, Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the British Empire, has been conferred upon Sir Craig Collins Reddie, who is a Scottish sports administrator, former chairman of British Olympic Association, and a former BWF President, for his valuable services to sport.


He has been honored with this highest of the six ranks award for his exceptional and distinguished services in sports. Earlier, he was officially recognized as one of the leading global figures in the world of sport. And now, he has been appointed as the Knight Grand Cross on 2018 Queen’s Birthday Honors. In spite of receiving fierce criticism, Craig religiously fought against drugs and dealt with controversial issues in sports.


In 1981, Sir Reedie was appointed as the 12th President of the International Badminton Federation, now known as Badminton World Federation, for a three-year term.


He played a crucial role for China’s entry into the International Badminton Federation and also, managed to bring the then-IOC President Juan Antonio Samaranch to visit the 1983 World Championships in Copenhagen.


Ergo, the classification and the caliber of badminton matches in Copenhagen greatly convinced Antonio Samaranch that the sport was impeccable to be accessorized at the Olympics.


Reedie assisted in building up the era of the professional player in badminton, and established the Grand Prix circuit in 1983.


Being Scottish Sports Administrator, the president of World Anti-Doping agency, and a representative of International Olympic Committee are some of his unparalleled achievements. He was also appointed CBE in 1999 and knighted by the Queen in 2013.

The award conferred today made Reedie extremely grateful and he said it is not only a great honor for me but also for WADA. He felt ecstatic for recognizing his hard work in fighting against doping in sport.


Reedie made some sedulous efforts by keeping highest level of vigilance and urging government to ban athletes who are involved in doping from two to four years.

Our Partners